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Apr 20, 2014
@ 11:12 pm
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The Infinite Jukebox »

isthisusernametakenyet:

image

Hello, Tumblr. See this thing?

It is the best goddamned thing you’ve seen all day.

Say hello to the Infinite Jukebox, an experiment in looping songs. See those curves cutting through the circle? What this bad boy does is analyze the song for similar beats…


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Apr 20, 2014
@ 11:09 pm
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24,090 notes

corycat90:

threw some color on these torterras for fun!

(via ollivander)


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Apr 20, 2014
@ 11:09 pm
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145,270 notes

(Source: mrbenwyatt, via petgrief)


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Apr 20, 2014
@ 11:08 pm
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150,057 notes

sweat-and-smiles:

long-distance-runnerr:

nezua:

motivation-station123:

bodydiy:

How to tie shoes for running

Wait I need this for my dystonia!!!!

seems like valuable info to pass along

I would have threw out 115$ shoes if I didn’t use the Toe problem one. God bless this post.

I use the heel slipping one and it actually works.

sweat-and-smiles:

long-distance-runnerr:

nezua:

motivation-station123:

bodydiy:

How to tie shoes for running

Wait I need this for my dystonia!!!!

seems like valuable info to pass along

I would have threw out 115$ shoes if I didn’t use the Toe problem one. God bless this post.

I use the heel slipping one and it actually works.

(via ollivander)


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Apr 20, 2014
@ 11:04 pm
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131,964 notes

militiamedic:

jesseproch:

emt-monster:

Please reblog if you know anyone who might take party drugs.

I’m not an emt yet, but everytime I see someone do drugs, I just hope they’re smart enough to remember these points.

As an nurse with ER experience, same thing. Dear God please just tell us what you took. I will not tell anyone from law enforcement or your parents or whoever, I just need to know so I can save your life. Please.

(via ollivander)


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Apr 15, 2014
@ 4:40 pm
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hersapphicexcellence:

hersapphicexcellence:

It’s 4/14/14

It’s an ABAB pattern
It’s a palindrome
If you add the digits it adds to 14

This makes me so happy

(via ollivander)


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Apr 15, 2014
@ 4:28 pm
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4,194 notes

itscolossal:

Gritty New Cityscapes by Jeremy Mann

(Source: anitaleocadia, via thepixelatednerd)


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Apr 15, 2014
@ 4:27 pm
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237 notes

theatlantic:

The Underrated, Universal Appeal of Science-Fiction

When I’m introduced to someone as a writer, a now familiar pattern of events often follows.
“Oh, really! How interesting!” the someone—let’s call her Jane—says, sounding quite enthusiastic. “What do you write?”
“Science fiction,” I say.
Jane instantly glazes over. “I’m afraid I never read science fiction.”
In other instances, people who know me have read a book of mine out of curiosity and then told me, in some surprise, that they liked it—“even though I don’t normally like science fiction.” Indeed, when a short story collection of mine won a non-genre prize, it was apparently a surprise to the judges themselves: According to the chair of the judging panel, “none of [them] knew they were science-fiction fans beforehand.”
The assumption seems to be that a book that comes with a genre label like “science fiction” must necessarily be lightweight stuff—not really comparable with “non-genre” works.
This may partly be due to the fact that the word “genre” has two different meanings which are often muddled up. The basic meaning of “genre” is simply kind or category or form of fiction, and in that sense, any work of fiction can be assigned to some genre or another. But “genre” is also used in a different way to make a distinction between “genre” and “non-genre” fiction. “Non-genre” fiction is the stuff that is placed on the “general fiction” or “fiction and literature” shelves in Barnes and Noble. “Genre” fiction is the stuff that is placed in its own designated corners: Crime, Fantasy, Romance, Horror, Science Fiction.
Read more. [Image: Phil Whitehouse / Flickr]

theatlantic:

The Underrated, Universal Appeal of Science-Fiction

When I’m introduced to someone as a writer, a now familiar pattern of events often follows.

“Oh, really! How interesting!” the someone—let’s call her Jane—says, sounding quite enthusiastic. “What do you write?”

“Science fiction,” I say.

Jane instantly glazes over. “I’m afraid I never read science fiction.”

In other instances, people who know me have read a book of mine out of curiosity and then told me, in some surprise, that they liked it—“even though I don’t normally like science fiction.” Indeed, when a short story collection of mine won a non-genre prize, it was apparently a surprise to the judges themselves: According to the chair of the judging panel, “none of [them] knew they were science-fiction fans beforehand.”

The assumption seems to be that a book that comes with a genre label like “science fiction” must necessarily be lightweight stuff—not really comparable with “non-genre” works.

This may partly be due to the fact that the word “genre” has two different meanings which are often muddled up. The basic meaning of “genre” is simply kind or category or form of fiction, and in that sense, any work of fiction can be assigned to some genre or another. But “genre” is also used in a different way to make a distinction between “genre” and “non-genre” fiction. “Non-genre” fiction is the stuff that is placed on the “general fiction” or “fiction and literature” shelves in Barnes and Noble. “Genre” fiction is the stuff that is placed in its own designated corners: Crime, Fantasy, Romance, Horror, Science Fiction.

Read more. [Image: Phil Whitehouse / Flickr]


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Apr 15, 2014
@ 4:24 pm
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3,792 notes

(Source: kitten-little, via infinity-imagined)


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Apr 14, 2014
@ 1:00 pm
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597 notes

twicr:

These inspired pieces from UK artist Nick Hamilton are fun and whimsical but don’t really make me feel any better about the impending robot uprising. He has these prints for sale if you are so moved.